Derek Dodds

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Wave Tribe SUP Hemp Boardbags

Introducing Our New Wave Tribe SUP Hemp Boardbags

Designed in collaboration with Solace SUP our new Wave Tribe SUP Hemp boardbags are the most eco bags in the industry. These stand up paddle board bags combine Wave Tribe unique innovative design elements and eco style to bring you the best SUP Boardbag available. These awesome SUP boardbags include aluminum mesh cooling shield on the bottom, 12 air flow vents, breathable eco hemp fabric and 6mm of closed cell foam padding that creates the perfect environment to keep your SUP safe from damaging UV rays, heat and dings.

We also made sure there are handles on all crucial points of the bag to make it easier to throw on top of your vehicle. A board bag is the key accessory you can ever invest in to prolong the life of your SUP board. It takes the stress out of the picture when transporting your board to your favorite paddle spot so you can concentrate on that solace feeling out on the water!

Its also cool to know your hemp sac uses less plastic and creates a lighter foot print on mother nature.

Grab one on wavetribe.com/sup

Wave Tribe SUP Hemp Boardbags

Wave Tribe SUP Hemp Boardbags

Surfing Jalisco Mexico

surfing jalisco mexico map

About Jalisco Mexico

Surfing Jalisco Mexico  is quite a phenomenon experience. The Jalisco region of Mexico contain a long series of beach breaks, river mouths, and the occasional reef, stretching from Puerto Vallarta in the north to the border of Michoacan in the south.[box type=”alert” size=”large” style=”rounded”]If you decide to venture into Michoacan please be careful because these days it has been reported that the Narco activity on this area may be hazardous to your health.[/box]

Let’s get back to Jalisco, the birth place of Tequila . . .

While it’s home to several high-quality waves like Tecuan, Campos Manzanillo, El Pariso, and Boca de Apisa, the jewel of this area is the infamous Pascuales. A thumping beach break that can hold 25+ foot waves. Pascuales is to Jalisco and Colima what Puerto Esondido is to Oaxaca—you’ve seen this wave in the mags—dangerous, hollow, and for experts (or you) only if there’s any hint of Southern Hemi in the water.

Crowds
Like in most of Mainland Mexico, crowds in Jalisco can vary wildly from spot to spot. The bulk of big-name spots in the area will have a crowd, and expect some pretty serious localism in the water at Pascuales, a wave so fierce, getting beat up on the beach will be the least of your concerns if you paddle out on big day.

Hazards
The usual in Mainland Mex: dangerous roads, corrupt cops, shallow reefs, Montezuma’s Revenge (a stomach bug in the water supply that can strand you in the bathroom for days on end), highway bandits, board liquefying beach breaks, and mosquitoes o’ plenty.

Yet, this trip is well worth all the challenges and risks—word on the street is that these days it’s a little sketchy up towards La Tica area but if you dare to travel into that region you will be rewarded with empty waves.

Surfing Jalisco Mexico

surfing pascuales

Pascuales, Mexico.

Summer
The rainy season, and hot as hell. This is the most consistent time for surf, with the South Pacific churning out regular south and southwest swells that end up peeling into the region’s point breaks, reefs and beach breaks. Most crowded with surfers, too. Watch out for hurricanes, as they can (and do) make landfall here on occasion.

Fall
September – November are the rainiest months in the rainy season, and as such, can be difficult to travel in. The upside is that there can be less wind so the surf can stay glassy all day; the downside is well, all the rain and mud and bugs it brings. South swells aren’t as dependable as spring and summer, but it’s still a reasonably consistent time to visit.

Winter
Perfect weather and minimal swell.

Spring
Can be the best time, as it’s not too hot, the rains haven’t started in earnest and south swells start hitting strong in May. Plus, it’s Spring Break, which can be a blessing or a curse, depending on your age and marital status.

Surfing Spots Jalisco Mexico

surf spots jalsico

Surfing, Eating & Sleeping In Pascuales, Mexico

Other than surf, there isn’t much to do or see in this small coastal town in Jalisco. You may want to stay down the road and drive in and surf Pascuales, but if you decide that you would rather get up with the chickens and surf before anyone drives in than we do have a few options for you.

Places to Sleep in Los Pascuales Mexico

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Well, it’s not the Sheraton but it’s as close as you will get out here in the wild west of Mexico. Check out Paco’s Hotel for 50 bones a night.

  • Reviews include: “ Great place to just crash” “Not great for families” “Safest place in town”
  • Amenities include: Seafood restaurant, AC and private bathrooms (you will definitely need the AC).
  • #1 of 2 on www.tripadvisor.com  and www.lonelyplanet.com states that it “very popular with experienced surfers” and your lost European backpacker.

Places to eat in Los Pascuales Mexico

Las Hamacus Dl Mayor

  • Reviews include: “Traditional and simple with bean tacos”
  • “Prawns are specialty”
  • “Best Ayamos ever eaten”
  • “Spectacular beach but dangerous to swim”

Manscos Homero (Located in Tecoman a short drive away)

Reviews include:

  • “I think these guys have the best mariscos in the great state of Colima”
  • “I am becoming kind of an aficionado when it comes to octopus.
  • “I never thought I would like it so much. I like the diabla sauce, but even more I just like it on the grill. You know it is really good by how tender it comes. Homero’s does it so much better than anywhere else I have tried it.”

Surfing, Eating & Sleeping In Barra de Navidad, Mexico

Barrede-Navidad

Barre de Navidad in Jalisco is an exposed beach, reef, rivermouth break that has reasonably consistent surf. Summer offers the best conditions for surfing. Offshore winds blow from the north northeast.

Clean groundswells prevail and the best swell direction is from the southwest. The beach break provides left and right handers and in addition, both left and right reef breaks add variety.

Relatively few surfers here, even on good days. Beware of rocks and sharks.

Forgot your surfboard or need some gear? Check out Barra Surf Shop & Bar.

Getting to Barra de Navidad

  • The closest passenger airport to Barre de Navidad is Playa De Oro International (Manzanillo) Airport (ZLO) in Mexico, which is 24 km (15 miles) away (directly).
  • The second nearest airport to Barre de Navidad is Colima Airport (CLQ), also in Mexico, 125 km (78 miles) away.
  • The third closest airport is Licenciado Gustavo Diaz Ordaz International (Puerto Vallarta) Airport (PVR), also in Mexico, 169 km (105 miles) away.

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Barrede-Navidad

Places to eat in BarraPlaces to Sleep in Barra

Casa Chips

Well kept boutique hotel right on the beach in Barra de Navidad. The hotel is centrally located in the town, within easy walking distance of restaurants and markets.

Reviews for Casa Chips look good . . .

“Our room had a terrace and ocean view. It was large, comfortable and CLEAN and even had a kitchenette! The staff was friendly and attentive. It was so easy to feel right at home in a totally new place in a different country. We will definitely go back again.”

Link to hotel on trip advisor.

Casa Colina– $$$$ Ultra High end but worth it

Link to hotel on Yelp.

Hotel Laguna del Tule– $$ Moderate price range

Link to hotel on Yelp.

Places to Eat in Barra

Restaurant Paty (link on Yelp)

Amber di Mare

If you’re looking for something different other then Mexican food this place looks great. They’re mostly Italian with some seafood variants. We ran across someone that loves this place and said, “We ate here twice in one week! We have been going to Ambar’s since 2000 and it is always fabulous. My husband LOVES the French onion soup, the crepes are delicious, the pizza is fabulous, and the Cesar salad was wonderful. Ambar’s is a rare gem in an unsuspecting place.”

Link to Amber on trip advisor.

For night-life options and a deeper dive into local restaurants in Barra check out this link.

Quimixto Mexico

DIEGO-MIGNOT1

Quimixto in Jalisco is a quite exposed beach break that has consistent surf. Summer offers the optimum conditions for surfing. Offshore winds are from the south.

Groundswells more frequent than wind-swells and the optimum swell angle is from the west southwest. The beach breaks offer lefts and rights. A fairly popular wave that can sometimes get crowded.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Be wary of rips – they make surfing dangerous.[/box]

Quimixto.surf.consistency.summer

Getting to Quimixto Mexico

  • The closest passenger airport to Quimixto is Licenciado Gustavo Diaz Ordaz International (Puerto Vallarta) Airport (PVR) in Mexico, which is 24 km (15 miles) away (directly).
  • The second nearest airport to Quimixto is Tepic Airport (TPQ), also in Mexico, 117 km (73 miles) away.
  • The third closest airport is Playa De Oro International (Manzanillo) Airport (ZLO), also in Mexico, 176 km (109 miles) away.

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Quimixto

Surfing Arroyo Seco

Arroyo Seco is small town 50 km north of Barra de Navidad. Empty Beach well know by the locals for it’s big waves. It’s hard for beginners, when the swell is small the waves break really fast and hard.

Type of Wave Beach break
Direction of Wave Right
Bottom Sand
Difficulty Intermediate surfer
Crowd Level Empty
Hazards none

 

Surf Camps In Jalisco

Surf-mexico.com was originally founded by three friends who love to surf. They help you find best places to stay, best places to surf and share surfing tips in Mexico.

http://www.surf-mexico.com/

Buen Viaje

Enjoy your trip, stay safe and let us know how your trip goes. Check out these other articles for some more details about the area:

 

2

Surfing Rio De Janeiro Brazil

Rio is one of those places on the earth that you always hear about and that you dream of going to one day—at least, that was one of my dreams for a long time.
Surfing RioMy first trip to Brazil was back in the early 2000s and I fell in love with Brazil on first site (or first visit).

I think I have been back about a dozen times since that first trip and each time I go I discover something new about this diverse country.

In 2010 I moved to Rio and gave living there a go—I got to know the city well and I surfed every imaginable wave in and around the city.

Rio is crowded, polluted, dangerous and yet seductively attractive. it’s one of those places you fall in love with and never stop dreaming about your love affair—it’s like falling in love with a prostitute, you know it’s not good for you but it sure does seem like the right thing to do in the moment.

Getting to Rio & Hotels

It’s going to cost you about a g-note to get to Rio, that is $1000 for you non-native speakers. It’s a long ass flight, like 18 hours from LAX and you usually have to stop in DC our Houston—there are no direct flights from Los Angeles.

If you go through DC give yourself a few hours between flights, I almost had a heart attack running to make my connection in DC—note to self, start running pre-trip to Brazil.

Once you land in Rio—and see the sprawl from the plane—don’t worry cause where you are staying is nothing like the area around the airport. It will take 45 minutes to one hour to get to your hotel from the airport. Watch you stuff on the freeway, smash and grab is a real thing.

There are a lot of neighborhoods to stay in but I suggest that you stay in the north (which is actually east but always feels like going north to me) near Leblon or in Barra de Tijuca. There is always a wave in Leblon and when it get’s big it will maintain shape off the rock point jetty.

Staying in Leblon will give you access to the fun areas of Rio, just hop on the boardwalk and walk towards the tall buildings or follow the local talent along the beach. If you stay in Barra de Tijuca it is way more laid back, the water is cleaner and the waves are spread out. The perfect trip is to stay a few days In Leblon and then move over to Barra de Tijuca.

[box type=”alert” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Please read my article of getting a gun shoved in my face to help you mitigate the danger factor in Rio and my tips for staying safe.[/box]

You got two options for housing in Rio, private or hotel. If you got the cash stay at the Radisson Hotel in Barra, it’s right on the water and surrounded by great restaurants and shopping. There is a good sandbar right out front, grab your gear and get out there and check it from the window of your hotel.

Sheraton Rio Hotel & Resort

Sheraton Rio Hotel & Resort

If you decide you want to be closer to Rio then the Sheraton sits just a few minute walk from the main beach at Leblon. It is really in a beautiful location overlooking the ocean, though not really surf-able out front.

Just behind the Sheraton is a Favela, it’s a trip cause you are sitting in your hotel room (costs like $200 a night) and from the balcony of the room you can see the Brazilian slums—it’s sounds worse than it is, yet this is the contrast of Rio and something that you’ll have to get used too.

If you aren’t into the hotel chains then check out all the awesome locations on Air B&B, I stayed at this place in Barra a few years ago and had a nice time. It’s super safe and you can see the break from the patio—though a bit noisy during the day as the traffic can get heavy on the main drag.

If you are down for a more authentic experience I like what these cats are doing at Rio Surf & Stay. I almost stayed there on my last trip but didn’t pull the trigger—the reviews are good and I did exchange a few emails with them and they were super cool.

* For the touristy stuff to see check this online guide or the one at the end of the article has some good tips.

Surfing Rio

In Zona Sul, the southern part of Rio and the place you’ll want to hang, there are some great waves that are a walk or a short bike ride away, and for the others, there are buses that can get you there.

You might want to consider renting a car—though it is a pain to park and to secure all your surf goodies. I recommend taking taxis or find a surf guide that can cart you back-and-forth to the far-way surf breaks.

You’ll want to stay in the southern area, my personal pick is Leblon or Barra like I mentioned above, the swell always seems to be a bit bigger there and the crowds are friendlier than at Arpoador. However, if the swell is macking you definitely want to paddle out at Arpoador, that left gets sick when the conditions are right . . . here is a photo of an excellent day.

surfing rio

Arpoador – Going Off

Top Picks For ‘Epic’ Rio Surf

Prainha is the spot of Rio, powerful lefts and rights with an amazing backdrop. Prainha can hold up to 12-15ft, show respect to the locals as in any other situation. On a big day paddle out next to the rocks on the south end of the beach, really fun left. Prainha is a 45 minute drive from downtown Rio and worth the trek. There is a fun wave in the middle section when the tide is right. Don’t miss this wave!

Arpoador is beside the big rock at the northern end of Ipanema has one of the best lefts around, but also one of the biggest and most aggressive crowds. f you want to fight for position you got to paddle in at the base of the rock while the sets roll in, it can be daunting as you navigate the take-off zone. If you can get one up top it’s a blast—get down the line fast. Super fun wave.

Leblon is at the south end of the Leblon/Ipanema beach has a wicked right hander off the canal outlet and also a nice bowl in the same area on smaller days. It has the best vibe in Rio. Even when it’s small you can catch some decent waves here. Right next to a sewage treatment plant, can get very dirty.

Top Pick for ‘Uncrowded’ Surf

surfing rio map

Barra is an 18 km long beach with many different breaks, there are tons of sand bars and many good waves to be had along this stretch. Barra also tends to be protected from some of the nastier winds that plague the city and it is usually blowing off shore at the north end of the beach—which is where you kite boarders want to go. If you want to escape the crowds you’ll find some deserted beach break here, its about a 30 minute drive from Ipanema. It’s one of the cleanest beaches in Rio.

Most ‘Adventurous’ Surf Spot in Rio

Grumari is where scenes from Cidade de Deus were filmed. It is a nice beach with a sandy bottom and easy left and rights. It’s about one hour from the city center and it wild and rustic. I had one of my best all time days here on a big swell. It is a beautiful spot and worth checking out.

Good Breaks in Rio With Right Swell

Copacabana or Leme are a few breaks along this stretch. In front of Posto 5 and 6 have the better breaks. Takes a bigger swell to get in here but when it does it can be really going off. I’ve also seen some really good waves along the fort at the north end of the beach, there are several takeoff points as the swell get bigger, better for a longer board.

Ipanema has various breaks scattered along its stretch, it is also a hive of activity and a great place to hang. Arpoador is at the north end of the beach and Leblon is at the south end—you could walk the distance in about 30 minutes and you won’t be disappointed by the view.

Macumba is one of the more pleasant beaches of Rio, various left and right peaks with an offshore bank that works on the bigger swells.

Any Day in The Water is A Good Day in Rio

Surfing Praia do Diabo

Praia do Diabo – Huge Day

Praia do Diabo is on the other side of the big rock is this little break, easy rights and sharper lefts. Good fun and better suited for a bodyboard.

Praia do Pepe is at one end of Barra de Tijuca, for wind-surfers and kite-surfers (possible to hire).

Recreio is over the hill from Macumba, good on the large south west swells.

Sao Conrado break is at the bottom of the favela Roçinha. Conrado is an intense, short wave, but be aware here due to the proximity of Roçinha, cleanliness of water is also an issue.

[box type=”download” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Download this free tourist guide for doing those non-surf related activities around Rio which you should put some time aside to check out.[/box]

Let’s check the swell forecast . . .



 


Rio De Janeiro Brazil Maps

rio maps

copacabana_beach_map

map of rio Barra de Tijuca

 

 

Feathers and Fur Surf & Yoga Mexico Retreat

Feathers Fur Surf Yoga Mexico Retreat

Join us for Feathers Fur Surf Yoga Mexico Retreat! One week of intentional and playful immersion into the worlds of surf and yoga, with Yours Truly! We have booked out Tailwinds Jungle Lodge for one week; just us, mother nature, the wild ocean, and our intentions to be fully present. Perhaps the odd turtle, scorpion, bat, snake, whale — WILD, NATURAL and FREE! Join us for Feathers and Fur Surf & Yoga Mexico Retreat!

Feathers and Fur Surf & Yoga Mexico Retreat

Feathers and Fur Surf & Yoga Mexico Retreat

For more information on Feathers and Fur Surf & Yoga Mexico Retreat:

4

Surfing in Peru

Peru – A Goofy Footers Dream Surf Destination

My bro always dreamed of going to Peru, he is a goofy-footer and he mainly surfs rights in California. I myself loves rights but once I ventured down to Peru my vision of going left changed and once I left that country I had a new fondness for the going backside.

If you are going to Peru on a surf trip I’d recommend taking a few days to  head into the mountains to visit Machu Picchu—now look I am a lover of the ocean, but I highly recommend that you take some time and visit this magical place.

Machu Picchu is one of those places but you’ll never forget, you’ll be transported to a different time, and the feelings that you’ll have while walking to the ruins we’ll remind you of the history of humanity.

Peru has mainly three surfing areas, the points in beaches to the south, the waves around Trujillo (this includes Chicama, sump report to be the longest left in the world, which I would agree with), and the third area is to the far north and include the beaches of Mancora.

Here is a quick map of Peru from Lonely Planet to get a view of the country.

I personally like the beaches around Trujillo, which offer a nice selection of beach break and point break. Trujillo is a short flight from Lima, that you should book as part of your original trip. Once you get to Trujillo, you need to take a taxi to Huanchaco—a town full of plenty of great places to eat and inexpensive accommodation right in front of the surf break.

There are several breaks to the north including Chicama and Pacasmayo, which serve up excellent waves and plenty of cultural distractions. The jewel of Peru is Chicama and any surf trip to Peru should be focused on this excellent wave.

We got very lucky on our trip because a major south swell slammed into the Peruvian coast and Chicama lit up like a Catholic Easter service and a Latin country. See the picture below.

Surfing Peru

Surfing Peru, the world famous Chica.

Surfing is a very popular activity in Peru especially after the emergence of the Peruvian Surf Champions. It has produced world wide champions such as Sofía Mulánovich, 2004 female world champion, Luis Miguel “Magoo” De La Rosa ISA World Masters Surfing Championship 2007 leader, and Cristobal de Col, 2011 World Junior Champion.

Best Time To Visit Peru – When The South Swells Fire.

All south and south West spots have very reliable swell from April to October. And from October to march north swell hit the coast. This means that during the south swell season you’ll be surfing around Lima or Trujillo and during the north window you’ll want to head to the northern region. The Main Surf Areas Of Peru

During spring and fall, short sleeves are fine, although long sleeves will work for the early or late sessions.

During winter time a 3/2mm rubber is OK. Booties are a great help to keep feet warm and protect them from rocks and shelves. Water temperature is not as cold as northern California but cold enough.

From Trujillo down you’ll want a 3/2 and if you get up north to Lobitos or Mancora you can shed the suit and surf in your shorties.

Surfing Peru – Where To Go?

Going north or south? There’re tons of waves around Lima, but I wouldn’t hang too long in that city, it’s kind of a shit hole. No offense to any Peruvians that might be reading this, because you have so many beautiful places in that country, but Lima isn’t one of them.

If you do get stuck in Lima, There are some waves in the city, but the water is nasty and the crowds are horrific. Now once you get out of the city and drive to the south you’ll find yourself in an entirely different situation with tons of surf along beautiful shoreline scattered amongst the small villages of the countryside.

My advice it to get the fuck out of Lima as quick as possible. You should always be prepared to charge large waves if you are going south of Lima, but if you do not surf this size, still there are many breaks with fun waves.  South of Lima is a perfect party place during summer and weekends are really busy.

If you wake up early, you can go surf while everyone is going back home after the nightlong party. Your main decision when visiting Peru, is to either go north or south.

Well actually, the decision is to either go south to the southern part of the north section or to the extreme North.

If you’ve read this article you know that I favor the beaches around Trujillo, but if you decide that you want a different kind of trip (and one not including Peru’s best wave) then you can decide to go South of Lima or to the beaches around Lobitos.

Side Trip To Machu Picchu If I were you, I would try and plan my trip for a 3 to 4 week window and leave a few days to fly back to Lima and up to Cusco which will put you at the doorsteps of Machu Picchu.

It’ll cost you a couple hundred dollars to get to Cusco from anywhere in the country by plane.

Once you’re in Cusco, Machu Picchu his a few hours away. You could do the whole trip in a few days and get back to the coast if you see a swell coming. For a complete breakdown of the specific waves in Peru:

Current Conditions:

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

North of Peru is one of the best places on earth to surf, many of locals from Lima have moved to the North for this purpose. In the North there are plenty of warm water waves, excellent seafood and not as many crowds as around the big cities. However, there are few beaches were crowd can be extreme like Cabo Blanco, and Máncora.

If you avoid the high seasons, you will be surfing great waves with only a hand-full of surfers. If you happen to be surfing during a very well publicized swell during the hight of the surf season then you will have lots of company including gangs of Brazilians—not something you want to see when you and your bro are surfing solo on that middle peak at Pacasmaya.

Chicama has good waves whenever a big south shows up. Some people swear that the extreme north of Peru is pure magic, but I love the waves around Trujillo.

Getting There

Peru enjoys a privileged location in the heart of South America, turning International Airport Jorge Chavez in Lima into an international hub for tourism and several airlines that reach many destinations in South America.

There are several domestic flights connecting the local destinations. There are direct and stop-over flights to Lima from the main capitals of the world. From LAX I’d get a direct flight to Lima and connect to Trujillo, not even stepping foot in Lima.

When you decide to visit Cusco you can book your flight online when the swell drops, no need to lock everything in before your trip—leave some flexibility for swell conditions. The entry points by land are:

  • From Ecuador: Aguas Verdes (Tumbes) via the Pan-Americana Highway and La Tina (Piura) from the city of Loja (Ecuador).
  • From Bolivia: There are two crossings, Desaguadero and Kasani, for travelers coming from La Paz and Copacabana respectively.
  • From Chile: Paso the Santa Rosa (Santa Rosa Pass) (Tacna) via the Panamericana Highway.

Accomodation

Peru has accommodations to suit every budget, especially in tourist hubs and cities.

There are several hostels at affordable price and on shared basis. But when it comes to surfing, you would always want to stay in close proximity to beach that offers good waves and are less crowded and in such cases it is best suited to go look for surf camps who will better understand your surf needs.

References: