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Surfing Quepos Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Surf Guide: Surfing Quepos + Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Surfing Quepos Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

The Basics

If you’re backpacking through Costa Rica, or are simply just hitting a few of the beaches in the southern Pacific region, then it’s likely that you’ve heard of either Quepos or Manuel Antonio. Both beaches offer a completely different vibe, so depending on what you’re looking for, you’ll fall in love with at least one of them.

Surfing Quepos Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Surfing Quepos

Personally, I stay in Manuel Antonio, but generally prefer to surf Quepos, assuming the wave is working.  These are two HUGE tourism towns in Costa Rica, so if you’re looking for a cheap, remote little surf town, then I highly suggest you seek your stoke somewhere else.  But, if you want to surf some fun breaks, meet beautiful girls (also surf bros for all those surf babes out there), and generally have some very interesting nights, then the Manuel Antonio Quepos gangbang is a great choice for any surf bum’s vacation.

Located only a short 2 hour drive from San Jose, Quepos serves as an ideal place to start your surf journey (especially considering Dominical, Uvita, and Pavones are all just due south).

Similar to every tourist heavy town in Costa Rica, you won’t find the 50 cent tacos and 1$ beers here, but you can definitely scrape by if you have a few hundred dollars in the bank account.

There’s a ton of epic restaurants and bars all over Manuel Antonio, with equally as much found in Quepos.  But, beware!  Quepos is home to a ton of sketchy Ticos and prostitutes, so unless you want a little something, something, I wouldn’t talk to any of the “fine” women in high heels.  Stick to the sun-kissed surf girls in the bikinis and you’ll go home with a few stories to brag about.

The Town Quepos + Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Similar to any surf town in Costa Rica, the atmosphere in both Quepos and Manuel Antonio is completely surf orientated.  Though you won’t have the abundance of surf hostels and surf shops of Jacó or Tamarindo, you will get a heavy dosage of surfage if you look in the right places.

Though Quepos generally gets a bad rap for robberies and loose women, if you have your head straight, you’ll find that the sketch balls leave you alone.  Just stay away from the Quepos pier/boardwalk at night, nothing good ever happens there, seriously never.

Alright, Quepos and Manuel Antonio are two entirely different towns, but they are located within 2 miles of one another, which is why we categorize them together in a surf guide.

Quepos Costa Rica

Quepos Costa Rica

Quepos is the Tico town located at the bottom of a giant hill, while Manuel Antonio is the town located at the top of the hill.  So, you’ll have to pass through Quepos to get to Manuel Antonio, which makes surfing both of them in a weekend super easy.

Quepos Costa Rica

First, let’s talk Quepos.  This is a fairly small Tico town located about 2 hours south of San Jose on the beach, just 1 hour south of popular Jacó.  Quepos is by no means a beautiful or quaint, not cute town, but the wave that breaks of the jetty makes it a gorgeous town in my opinion.

I don’t visit surf towns because they’re beautiful, I visit surf towns because I can get stoked and drink rum.  If you want to soak in an infinity pool, eat a steak dinner, and get massages all day, my advice is to go to Hawaii.  Quepos is gritty, but safe, so in my opinion, it’s a win-win.

From my experiences, the locals in Quepos are a lively bunch and are just looking to get drunk with a few Gringos, so if you sport a smile and a little spirit for adventure, you’ll love it here.  But, for those that are willing to spend a little more money, or just want to enjoy a more aesthetic town, then hop on the bus up to Manuel Antonio for 50 cents and see what it has to offer.

Manuel Antonio

Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Not A Gringo

Manuel Antonio is a great place for backpackers, couples, solo travelers, families, or basically anyone that wants to wake up on top of a mountain and peer out at the vast Pacific Ocean.

Manuel Antonio is perched at the peak of a mountain, so regardless of where you choose to stay, you’ll be able to bask in the glory of Costa Rican jungle.  I’m much more familiar with Manuel Antonio as far as accommodations and eateries, so listen up and you’ll be treated.

Depending on you budget, you may want to buy your own food and cook it yourself, but I highly recommend a few restaurants if you have the funds.

First and foremost, El Patio is just about the dankest food in Costa Rica.  They blend Caribbean style cuisine with fresh seafood to literally spin heads.  Last time I was there, they had a Teriyaki Coconut Mango Tuna steak that I would eat 365 days a year and never complain about.

Though they have gnarly cool combinations of all sorts of seafoods and sauces, you won’t be able to afford this place on a poor man’s budget.  Meals are generally like 20$ a plate, so only go here if you can swing it.

If you’re working with 5$/day for food, then split the bill at the Super Joseth with your buddy.  You can get two huge ass Tuna steaks, coconut mango marinate, a bag of rice, and fresh veggies for 10$.  Don’t believe me?  Ask my buddy Uncle Steve, he still talks about my seared Tuna.  Apart from the high end restaurants, you can generally find a fish taco for 2$, but like I said before you’re better off cooking your own meals while in Manuel Antonio.

Surfing Quepos, Costa Rica

Surfing Quepos, Costa Rica

Surfing Quepos, Costa Rica

Quepos:  This is a tricky one, because sometimes it works and sometimes it’s flat.  I’ve seen it at 1 foot and I’ve seen it at 10 feet and let me tell you, when it’s working at 10, paddle out.

Although I almost always stay in Manuel Antonio, I’ll bus down to Quepos any day if the wave wants to work.  The wave is always going to break left, which is rad for everyone, because it’s a super clean left.

The wave isn’t as heavy as say, Dominical, so you can catch it and ride that puppy for a few hundred yards.  If you want a barreling wave, then you want a big strong southwest or west swell, because anything under waist height will probably be pretty mushy.

Quepos used to be a pretty rad left that broke to the beach, but with the construction of the jetty, it breaks out pretty deep.

[box type=”info” style=”rounded” border=”full”]Though everyone thought the construction of the new harbor was going to destroy the wave, it did the exact opposite.  Now, the wave peels cleaner, faster, and ultimately makes for a much better ride.[/box]
Manuel Antonio National Park

Manuel Antonio National Park

Manuel Antonio:  There isn’t a whole lot to say about this wave, because it’s going to be your typical fun-sized beach breaking wave.

If you head down the beach a few kilometers you’ll hit Playa Playitas.  Playitas brings in much better waves, but Manuel Antonio beach is perfect for beginners or intermediates that want to perfect their style.

You can take a bus that runs from Quepos to the beach in Manuel Antonio for just under 1$, which will take you directly to the beach.  You won’t have to pay a national park entry fee, nor deal with too many surf beginners, because the majority of tourism in Manuel Antonio is geared towards birdwatching and hiking.

Although this wave generally stays under head height, if you get a strong SW swell, expect a little power.  I’ve had incredibly days at Manuel Antonio and would definitely recommend it to anyone that wants a nice salty long boarding Sunday.

Where to Stay Quepos & Manuel antonio

Depending on your budget, you can stay at a variety of different places.  Hotels are great, houses can be rented, but generally, hostels are the best options for backpackers and surfers.

Hotel Vista Serena Manuel Antoio

Hotel Vista Serena Manuel Antoio

Vista Serena:  One of the best and most affordable accommodation options in Manuel Antonio.  This place is run by Conrad and his mother (both Ticos) and they truly make all their guests feel right at home.

La Serena offers a ton of different room options (dorms, privates, cabinas, etc), so you’ll be able to find something that suits your needs.  Rooms go for 10-20$ night and all options are clean and safe.  You can lock up your valuables, watch an epic sunset, or just kick it on one of the several hammocks.

http://www.vistaserena.com

Backpackers:  The long standing backpacker hostel in Manuel Antonio is an affordable, yet not always the safest options for backpackers.  I’ve heard horror stories of people getting their packs and boards lifted at cheap hostels, so I usually just splurge the extra 2$ and stay somewhere a bit more comfortable.

http://www.backpackersmanuelantonio.com/index.php/en/

La Mariposa Hotel Manuel Antoio

La Mariposa Hotel Manuel Antoio

La Mariposa:  This is the ultimate option for people who have money to spend, or for those surfers that are visiting during the dead low season.  This is a five star resort, but I’ve found accommodation for 120$/night.

That’s 60$ a person for easily the best accommodation in the area.  There’s monkeys, toucans, sloths, and all sorts of wildlife running around the hotel, but you obviously won’t be getting your room for 10$.  If you have the funs, I’d definitely recommend La Mariposa.

http://www.lamariposa.com

To Sum it Up

Quepos and Manuel Antonio are two incredibly beautiful destinations in Costa Rica, especially if you’re somewhat interested in wildlife.  I’ve seen just about every animal from whales to sloths here, all while getting a heavy dosage of wave ripping.

It is definitely not you average cheap, surf bum town, but sometimes you have to pay a little extra to have the breathtaking views of this blessed country.

If you’re traveling with your girlfriend or family, this is an excellent way to spend time surfing, while also enjoying the wildlife of Costa Rica!

Maps Quepos + Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

Maps Quepos + Manuel Antonio Costa Rica Maps Quepos + Manuel Antonio Costa Rica Maps Quepos + Manuel Antonio Costa Rica

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Surfing Pavones Costa Rica The Longest Left In The World

Surf Guide: Surfing Pavones Costa Rica The Longest Left In The World

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica Photo © Colin Briers

The Basics Surfing Pavones Costa Rica

Nearly all of Costa Rican surf towns have been engulfed by tourism, which can truly put a damper on a surf trip to Central America.  When you visit the majority of Costa Rican surf towns, you’re going to have to deal with the beginner hussies, expensive fish tacos, and most likely, a crowded lineup.

Pavones is a tad different. Renowned as one of the most desolate and remote surf destinations in the entire country—Pavones provides surfers with a total surf oriented experience.

Being that it’s so difficult to reach, Pavones lacks the extreme amounts of surfers from around the world and rather caters to the die hard barrel hunters.  Yes, you can get barreled in Pavones if you get the right swell. Pavones encompasses 10 miles of different beaches, which lines the nearly untouched Golfo Dulce area of Costa Rica. Thanks to Colin for letting us use his sick shot of Pavones—if you are looking for a surf camp in the area we highly recommend his sight: https://unaola.com/

Dulce – a fresh look at Pavones from Patrick McMahon on Vimeo.

The Rio Claro is one of the clearest rivers in Central America and this dazzling spectacle feeds into the gnarliest left breaking wave in the entire country.

Pavones is considered to be possibly the longest warm water left in the world, which is why so many people have attempted to reach it, though only few have actually made the trek. I have surfed both Chicama in Peru and Pavones in Costa Rica and on they both give the title ‘world’s longest left’ a run for the money. The only way to know is to surf them both yourself.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Literally, you can hit this left for 1 mile+, and I’m not even exaggerating.[/box]

One of the greatest parts of Pavones is the entirely chilled-out, relaxed vibe that the area offers.  Located in nearly the most southern point of the south pacific region of Costa Rica, Pavones is a little slice of heaven that thousands of surfers have dreamt of visiting.  There isn’t the chaos of a tourist heavy atmosphere here, so you can crush waves all day, grab a slice of pizza, and enjoy a nice brew in this desolate surfer destination.

The Wave Surfing Pavones Costa Rica

The waves in Pavones are legendary.  Honestly, if you ask any old time surfer in the South Pacific and they don’t tell you Pavones is the raddest destination in southern Costa Rica, then they are lying to you.

Pavones is situated in the “deep-south” of Costa Rica, on the southern side of the Gulfo Dulce, near the small ecologically heavy town of Golfito.

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica Map

Southern Costa Rica Region

You won’t be able to reach Pavones unless you truly want to rip it, because it’s just about the hardest wave to reach in all of Costa Rica.  Though it may be a hard wave to get to, finding the town of Pavones is very simple, you just need to have the motivation to get your ass from San Jose to Pavones.

It’s about 8 or 9 hours from San Jose the capital and if you’re taking a bus, the trip can take 16+ hours, due to the amount of bus transfers that it requires.  The majority of surfers rent a 4×4 car and can reach it without too much trouble, that’s my best advice to you.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Pavones is a world class wave, consistent as all hell (150 days/year), and is without a doubt the longest left in the country. [/box]

The one problem with Pavones is that it needs a big southern swell to create the monster left that you want. The beach has a sandy bottom with rocks and the point is a long wrap around on a beach of boulders, so watch where you toss your board.

Surfing Around Pavones

If the swell is working and you’re in Pavones, the wave goes on forever.  Typical length is between 400-900 meters, which is ample enough time for you to have the left of your life.  I must warn you, though Pavones is incredibly remote, when the swell hits, the town gets crowded.

There’s a ton of surfers in the south pacific region of Costa Rica, so you can imagine, word travels fast as a Japanese bullet train.

One other little unknown secret about the area is that you can also head south of Pavones and surf a point called Punta Banco, where you’ll be able to find lefts and rights.  Punta Banco is much less crowded when the sell hits, so can be ideal for surfers that don’t want to deal with a crowded lineup. You didn’t hear it here.

Overall, Pavones is one of my personal favorite spots to visit in Costa Rica.  It’s awesome when an enormous swell hits my hometown of Uvita and since the wave won’t hold, we grab a crew of Ticos, rent a van, and head down to the holy land of Pavones, Costa Rica.

You want a south west, south swell, the wave starts working at 3-5 feet and holds out to 16+ . . . let check the swell now.

Check Current Surf Forecast




You can surf at any tide, during any hour of the day, during any weather conditions, because you’re in Pavones and should surf regardless of the conditions anyways.  The only downside is how crowded it can get, but that’s a small price to pay when you can ride the wave for 500+ meters.

No complaints here mon, just a ton of stoke!

Staying In Pavones Costa Rica

Pavones is a small Costa Rican town located in the southern Pacific zone, near the town of Golfito (about 1.5 hours south).  The entire town is reliant on its surf community, but there’s a ton of birds, so there’s also some birdwatchers.

If you catch Pavones at its peak, you can ride it the entire length of the town and impress all the cute girls watching from the beach—some of them birdwatchers. While the majority of the population is Costa Rican, a large amount of international expats have voyaged to Pavones and have been calling it home for decades.

Pavones Surf Shop

Pavones Surf Shop

Due to the amount of international cultures in Pavones, there’s definitely a very cosmopolitan vibe to the area, which makes it more welcoming for foreigners.

Though Pavones is incredibly small and remote, it does have a few different restaurants for surfers to enjoy, but remember, there aren’t a ton of options. There is a small surf shop called Sea Kings in Pavones—grab those goodies you forgot. The also have some boards for hire and offer surf lessons.

Eating in Pavones

Obviously there are the small Tico Soda restaurants, serving up Gallo Pinto, Arroz con Pollo, and other Costa Rican dishes.  Also, there’s a small Italian restaurant which dishes up tasty slices of pizza, small pasta dishes, and some other Italian infused recipes.

The only other restaurant I know if the upscale Brazilian style buffet, which has vegetarian and meat eating choices for surfers that have a little more cash to spend on gourmet meals.

There’s also a small supermarket, but it has all the essentials you’ll need.  Meat, fresh veggies, fruit, bread, milk, eggs . . . and yes, beer!

Also, if you happen to be traveling with people who aren’t die hard surfers (likely not the case) then there are a few no surf activities. There’s a yoga studio called Shooting Star Studio where surfers or non-surfers can get a quality stretch in pre or post surf.

Costa Rica Sloth Pavones Surfing Pavones Costa Rica Map

Costa Rica Sloth

Get in the rental and check out a few waterfalls in the area or book a fishing charters in Golfito. Or good old school and just take a walk with your camera for a ton of wildlife right in you back—and front—yards.

If you want to take a day off from the waves, or they aren’t delivering, the Osa Peninsula is right around the corner and it’s one of the most bio diverse places in the world.  You can see Scarlet Macaws, sloths, monkeys, dolphins, whales . . . the list goes on-and-on.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]All in all, Pavones has a plethora of activities for people to enjoy, but the main reason people flock to this remote little Tico town is for the gnarliest left in the world. [/box]

It’s a peaceful place, where you can surf waves, meet people from around the world, share badass stories, and see some of the world’s rarest wildlife.  If you want laid-back with a mix of epic surfing, I don’t know any place better than Pavones, Costa Rica.

Where to Stay In Pavones Costa Rica

I normally sleep in the van we rent, or camp in a tent on one of the various camping area, but there are a bunch of housing options for people that don’t want to be such a surf dirtbag. When I role with the ladies I usually stay at one of the following options.

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Staying in Pavones Option 1: Cabinas La Ponderosa

These are very cozy, homey cabins, tended by a super cute couple.   They make you feel at home and provide you with just about anything you’d need while surfing or vacationing in Pavones. Roberta from Brazil said about staying there, “Amazing place, amazing people, amazing vibe.”

There’s a common area, WiFi, spacious cabins, and a ton of videos to watch—there’s a lot of down time in Pavones.  But the best part about La Ponderosa is without a doubt the care that Marshall and Angela McCarthy provide their guests.

Got an extra 100k lying around? Marshall and Angela have some property opportunities listed on their site that look enticing.

Tell them Jason says hello and give them a hug for me, they’re great people—if you buy some land, can I sleep on it?

http://laponderosapavones.com/site/

Staying in Pavones Option 2: Caza Olas Hotel and Hostel

This place has a ton of different accommodation options.  You can get private rooms, cabins, shared dorms, private rooms with shared bathrooms, the whole shebang.  Rooms start at 15$/night for the shared rooms and privates are anywhere from 30-60$/night.

There’s a big kitchen, full of kitchen equipment, WiFi, hammocks, chairs, a porch, comfortable beds, and a super clean hotel.  You can rent surfboards here, book tours, and park your car in a safe location.  Cash only, like most of Pavones and Costa Rica.

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/costa-rica/peninsula-de-osa-and-golfo-dulce/pavones/hotels/cabinas-casa-olas

Staying in Pavones Option 3: Cabinas Sol Y Mar

This are another option if you want to do the cabin route of accommodation.  I’ve never personally stayed here, but have surfed with a ton of people who have.  Only good things.  You get your own cabin with a kitchen, bathroom, and private space.  Great for surf crews that want to have their own private area. There’s an open air bar and restaurant, WiFi, and a very laid-back atmosphere.

http://www.zancudo.com/sol_main.htm

Let’s take a quick break and take a great look at the wave during a solid swell . . .

To Sum it Up

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica

Pavones is one of the most unique locations in the entire country of Costa Rica.  You’ll spend hours reaching this little surf town, but it will be worth every mile (if the swell hits).

Surfers from around the world have been flocking to Pavones for the better part of century and the waves send surfers home happy.

There aren’t a lot of places where you can get unbelievably pitted for 500 meters 150+ days out of the year, but at Pavones, you can.  So pack your back, stuff your board bag with you favorite rip sticks, and head on down to Pavones, Costa Rica.

There may not be a whole lot to do as far as parting and nightlife are concerned, but you get to have the pleasure of getting up close and personal with nature in Pavones.

I’d recommend Pavones for any surfer visiting Costa Rica, it’s a must see.  Get stoked my friends!

Maps Pavones

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica Map

Surfing Pavones Costa Rica Map

Southern Costa Rica Map

Southern Costa Rica Map

Southern Costa Rica Map

Southern Costa Rica Map

Surfing Playa Dominical Costa Rica

Surfing Playa Dominical Costa Rica

playa dominical costa rica mapThe Basics:

Playa Dominical is a hippie haven for surf junkies and yogis alike, for this little slice of paradise is one of the least developed beaches in the entire country.  Apart from being the cheapest, safest, and arguably, most authentic, Playa Dominical offers one of the largest waves in the country.

The surf report for Dominical normally turns off the less experienced surfers, so most of the time you surf here, it’s going to be pretty empty.  That’s not to say you’ll get a 1pm lineup to yourself, but if you’re an early riser, bet on getting pitted for 2+ hours.

Unlike the other beaches in Costa Rica, Dominical virtually has no resorts or hotels.  If you look back at the beach from the break line, all you really are going to see is lively palm trees and a few pieces of driftwood.  There aren’t any buildings above 2 stories, so the vibe here is very simple, happy, and surf oriented.

The Waves:

This desolate beach offers a few different points, so there’s always plenty of room for everyone to catch a few beauties.  Depending onyour skill (and fear) level, you can find the best wave of the area right next to the river mouth, but I’ve seen barreling waves just about everywhere in Dominical.  Thefirst time I surfed Dominical I instantly fell in love with everything about the waves.

playa dominical costa rica surfingPlaya Dominical is a strong barreling wave, where the wave holds size without closing out, but with a strong wave comes consequences.  Don’t be surprised to see broken surfboards and unexperienced surfers being pulled out to sea.  As long as you can hold your own through a strong riptide and overhead wave, I wouldn’t worry to much.

For the surfers that are less experienced, but still want to be able to stay and surf near Dominical, should head to nearby (1km) Dominicalito.  These waves are considerably smaller and rarely get over shoulder height, allowing beginners to enjoy a day on the water without worrying about breaking a rental.

The first day they rolled slow, the second day some power developed and we were cutting back like nobody’s business, and by the end of the week, we were dropping in on double overheaders.  I haven’t had many better days of surf in my life, so if there’s a fresh swell coming in through Dominical, my advice is: call in sick.  Especially if you’re getting high tide at around 5:00am/5:30pm, those are going to be the best days to be surfing Dominical.  I always prefer to surf two 1.5 hour sessions, gives me time to enjoy my day and explore the towns in which I’m surfing.

Check out the barrels in Dominical!

Nearby Beaches

playa dominical costa rica map surfPlaya Tamarindo

Playa Grande

Playa Negra

Playa Langosta

Marbella (this place is epic)

The Town:

This town is so tiny, but has so much to offer, something that really makes it unique.  Most Costa Rican towns aren’t going to offer all the amenities you’ll find in Dominical.  Though it doesn’t have resorts and skyscrapers, it has a ton of little storefronts and rum bars that usually get pretty crazy at night.

Another awesome thing about Dominical is that it’s surrounded by natural waterfalls!  Literally you can go on a jog and find a waterfall.  Normally there will be a bunch of local kids running with towels in the jungle, follow them and you should find yourself a nice 200 foot waterfall.  These falls make for a great day hike between sessions.  Ask a local where you can find a waterfall and they’ll be happy to point you in the right direction, Ticos love waterfalls.

The vibe in Dominical isn’t geared towards partying as much as a surf city like San Diego, but it’s definitely there.  Dominical basically only has two streets, both of which are filled with small surf hostels, Tico restaurants, and little souvenir shops.

One of the best features of the town is the local markets that get set up from 8am-5pm every day.  Here, you’ll find everything from handmade bracelets to Romeo & Juliette Cuban cigars  (super cheap here compared to other parts of C.R.).  These market stands are all set up right along the strip of road that borders the beach, so feel free to forget the sandals and shirt at home and just stroll the beach, there’s a ton to look at.  Most of the trinkets and knick-knacks are going to cost you between 2$-10$, while the larger carvings and knitted clothing is going to range into the 20-50$ range.

One thing that makes Dominical an ideal destination for backpacking surfers is its affordability.  You can easily live off 300$ for a week, that being said, you won’t be living the lavish, eat out every night, drink until bar close lifestyle.  Food and drink is cheap if you find the right market (or local) to buy your produce and liquor off of (there’s a few old ladies that sell rum infused with banana and strawberries).  In short, the town of Dominical is tiny, but the waves are huge and the weather is perfect.

How to get Here:

playa dominical costa rica road map

Though Dominical is located pretty far south along the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, it’s surprisingly easy to get there.  Depending on your mode of travel, it can take anywhere between 5 and 8 hours to reach it.

Most likely, you’ll be flying into San Jose International Airport and from here, it’s about 4.5 hours if you drive in a rental car or private shuttle.  If you’re like me, and don’t have the funds to pay a shuttle 200$, then you’ll be a bus warrior!  I understand that the language barrier can be scary for some people, but trust me, Costa Ricans are incredibly helpful and very nice.

The easiest way to get to Dominical is either hopping on the direct bus from San Jose to Dominical (though this bus sometimes takes 8 hours!) or taking the bus from San Jose to Quepos, then transferring over to Dominical from Quepos.  My best advice would be to make the journey from San Jose to Dominical a 2 or 3 day journey.  There’s a few really good surf beaches on the way to Dominical, so if you have the time to visit Quepos and Manuel Antonio, I highly suggest you do.

If you have limited time, then from the San Jose airport, take a taxi to the Delio Morales bus company (every taxi driver will know what that means).  This direct San Jose to Dominical bus leaves at 6 am and 3pm, but those times are subject to change.  Unlike so much of Costa Rica, the route between San Jose and Dominical is 100% paved, which makes travel way quicker and easier.

Where to Stay:

dominical costa rica hotels

Piramy’s Cool Vibes Hostel:  This is where I stay when I go to Dominical, because it’s affordable, comfortable, and only about 200 feet from the beach.  A cute French couples own it, they’re super young and cool with ju

st about everything.  This isn’t a surf party hostel, but it’s probably the chillest accommodation option in the entire town.  Dorm beds cost between 8-12/night, while the private rooms are 25$/night.  The price is really absurd considering the view and care you get at Cool Vibes.  I mean, it’s called “Cool Vibes”, everyone is going to be rad as hell!

Tortilla Flats:  This is a local favorite.  They have great food, amazing drink specials, and know how to throw a proper party.  If you want to stay up late, rip shots of high proof rum, and meet some badass locals, then Tortilla Flats is the place to be.  A lot of the Ticos that hang here can DK Boogie board better than you can probably surf, so make sure you don’t disrespect these guys; they’re all legends.  Prices for rooms are a little more expensive, you’re going to spend anywhere between 20$ and 80$ per night here.

Hotel Cuna Del Angel:  This is your standard luxurious hotel option.  It’s located a little further from the beach than the hostels, so it’s much more quiet.  Rooms start at 110$/night and go up from there.

Renting a house:  This is the best option for people that want to bring all their surf buddies and have the time of their lives.  Rental homes in Costa Rica are very cheap, it’ll cost you about 1,000$/week for a house/cabana close to the beach.  I’ve rented a cabana from Pyram’s for a week and the total cost was 250$ for 5 nights, and we stuffed 8 of us in there.  Cheap as all hell.

To Sum it Up: 

Playa Dominical is a less developed version of Jacó (minus the drugs and prostitutes), for it’s nearly surrounded by lush rainforest.  Dominical is a must see for any surfer who’s trying to get totally stoked without paying the hefty fees of a tourist town.  If you’re looking for power and height, then this is probably a great option, but if you’re still a beginner, I’d stick to nearby Uvita or Quepos.