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Surfing Sinaloa Mexico

Surfing Sinaloa Mexico

Surfing Sinaloa Mexico

Surfing Sinaloa Mexico

Surfing Sinaloa Mexico

Located in mainland Mexico at the entrance to the Sea of Cortez, the area is a magnet for south and southwest swells. Ranging from hollow A-frame beach breaks to incredible world class point breaks, surfers of all ability levels will get a thrill of a lifetime—or at lest Mexico-time.

The point breaks offer truly remarkable waves that can wrap for more than 500 yards. This wave can be both a hollow and thumpy—offering some barrel time and fast shoulders to race into the inside.

Most of the areas are all sand bottom and water temperatures hover around 75-85 degrees from May through November, hence no wetsuits are required.

In April, a vest or spring-suit may be desirable. Typically there is always an off-shore flow in the morning that lasts until early afternoon.

Surfing in Sinaloa is a damn good experience!

Surfing Sinaloa Mexico Surf Spots

Surfing Patoles – World Class Left Point Break

Patoles

Patoles

Type: point break

Reliability: fairly consistent

Best: Swell SW | Wind ENE

Average Sea Temperature : 25.9 °C

Best Season to surf:  The important thing to remember is not to try during the rainy season—surf season is from March to Oct.

Patoles in Sinaloa is an exposed point break that has quite consistent surf. Summer offers the best conditions for surfing. Works best in offshore winds from the east northeast.

Groundswells more frequent than windswells and the best swell direction is from the southwest. Good surf at all stages of the tide and it’s rarely crowded here. Submerged rocks are a hazard though. Patoles can be reached by any rental car from Mazatlan in less than two hours.

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Patole/reliability_by_season

Marmols – World class left point break

Type: point

Reliability: very consistent

Best: Swell SW | Wind ENE

Average Sea Temperature: 26.0 °C

Marmols Left Point in Sinaloa is an exposed point break that is usually a safe bet and works all around the year. Works best in offshore winds from the east northeast. Most of the surf here comes from groundswells and the best swell direction is from the southwest. Even when there are waves, it’s not likely to be crowded. Watch out for rocks.

Marmols Surf Quality and Wind Quality by season:

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Marmols-Left-Point/reliability_by_season_favourable_wind

Dimas River Mouth – Left/right A frame

sinaloa1

Type: beach

Reliability: fairly consistent

Best: Swell SW | Wind ENE

Average Sea Temperature: 26.1 °C

Dimas Rivermouth in Sinaloa is an exposed beach break that has quite reliable surf and can work at any time of the year. Ideal winds are from the east northeast.

Dimas tends to receive distant groundswells and the best swell direction is from the southwest. Waves at the beach are both lefts and rights. Even when there are waves, it’s not likely to be crowded. Rocks are a hazard.

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Dimas-Rivermouth/reliability_by_season

Rucos – Beach Break

sinaloa2

Type: beach

Reliability: consistent

Best: Swell SW | Wind E

Average Sea Temperature: 26.0 °C

Rucos in Sinaloa is an exposed beach break that has consistent surf. Summer offers the optimum conditions for surfing. Ideal winds are from the east. Rucos receives distant groundswells and the best swell direction is from the southwest.

Waves at the beach are both lefts and rights. Good surf at all stages of the tide. Rarely crowded here. Beware of rocks, locals and sharks.

Rucos Surf Quality by Season:

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Rucos/reliability_by_season

Celestino – Point Break

Type: point

Reliability: consistent

Best: Swell SW | Wind NE

Average Sea Temperature: 25.0 °C

Celestino

Celestino in Sinaloa is an exposed point break that has consistent surf. Summer offers the best conditions for surfing. Offshore winds blow from the northeast. Ideal swell direction is from the southwest. When it’s working here, it can get crowded. Dangerous rips are a hazard.

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/Celestino/reliability_by_season

El 29 A Dimas – Beach Break

Type: beach

Reliability: very consistent

Best: Swell SW | Wind ENE

Average Sea Temperature: 26.3 °C

El 29 A Dimas in Sinaloa is an exposed beach break that has very consistent surf. Summer offers the optimum conditions for surfing. The best wind direction is from the east northeast. Tends to receive distant groundswells and the optimum swell angle is from the southwest. The beach breaks offer lefts and rights. Rarely crowded here. Watch out for rocks.

http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/El29-A-Dimas/reliability_by_season

Surf Camps

Sinaloa Surf Adventures

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Sinaloa Surf Adventures (SSA) is the longest running surf camp in Northern Mexico having been in business for 11 years. Recently, the camp was awarded the Mexico State Tourism award for top recreational business in Mexico.

Set in the small, tranquil fishing village of Las Barres, SSA provides a place to get away from the stress of everyday life while experiencing world class surf. This overlooked region in Mexico has been referred to as “the land that time forgot” and the “promised land”.

For decades surfers have flown right over the area for more well-known and overcrowded surf breaks. Arguably, the area around this part of Mexico has the most world-class breaks per mile on this side of the globe.

SSA is also very unique in that it surfs areas that are completely isolated and non-accessible. Image paddling out at your local break and it’s just you and your buddies, that’s what every day is like at SSA. There is simply no other place like SSA in the world.

SSA offers, best in class service, beach front accommodations, air conditioned rooms, great food, tons of memories and of course…world class, un-crowded surfing.

Barras de Piaxtla Surf Camp

Barras de Piaxtla Surf Camp is located 1 hour and 15 minutessurfing sinaloa north of Mazatlán in the small fishing village of Las Barras De Piaxtla.

If you would like to spend your day learning how to surf on pristine secluded beaches, enjoying a cold drink in a hammock 10 feet from the ocean, sea kayaking, feasting on lobster, or warming your bones next to a beach bonfire, then Barras de Piaxtla Surf Camp is the place for you.

The waves are usually small to medium in height and perfect for surf lessons. There are no crowds and plenty of space to make learning how to surf easy! The surf camp will provide all your surfing equipment. All you have to do is show up!!

Getting There

Culiacán International Airport  is an international airport located at Culiacán, Sinaloa, Mexico. It handles the national and international air traffic of the city of Culiacán. It is easy and cheap to get to with flights from Los Angeles roughly 2 ½ hours with an average cost of $325.00.

Where to Stay

The Palms Resort of Mazatlán

The Palms Resort of Mazatlán is located on the beautiful beachesThe Palms of Mazatlan of Mazatlán, in front of the three islands in the Golden Zone.

This hotel really seems to go all out for it’s guests. They will book excursions, fishing trips and the restaurant will even cook your caught fish for you! If you sleep in late the cleaning service will still clean your room and they have an amazing coffee bar with fresh squeezed orange juice every morning if you decide not to sleep in.

The bar will bring your margaritas to your room for you if you want to enjoy the sunset in privacy. The only issues I’ve seen are that the beds are a little hard and they could use a couple more servers around the pool. But for the views, cleanliness and service the price seems to be worth every penny.

Quality Inn Mazatlán

The Quality Inn Mazatlán is perfect for if you’re on a budget and just Surfing in Sinaloaneed a nice place to crash after a long day of surfing.

They offer all the same amenities that all Quality Inns offer (free breakfast, wifi, pool and tv), there’s only 3 channels in English but it’s not like you’re in Mazatlán to watch TV anyway.

It’s about a 5 minute walk to the beach and many local clubs and restaurants are within walking distance just stay away from a place called “Panama” apparently they have terrible service. No mini fridges but all in all seems like a great place to stay for the value.

Where to Eat

Pancho’s Surfing Sinaloa

Pancho’s is located in Mazatlán in the “Golden Zone” right on the beach. Check them out for breakfast, lunch or dinner if you’re in the mood for some really good Mexican Seafood. Have an awesome Margarita with some Shrimp Kabobs, sit back and enjoy the beautiful view.

 

Surf’s Up Café

Surf’s Up Café  is located in Mazatlán right next to thesurfing sinaloa El Sol La Vida Beach Resort. When you walk in you can really tell that the owner Leanne loves what she does. Everything is homemade from the exquisite soups, caramel apples, burgers, hand cut papayas and Cubano sandwiches.

There’s tables right in the sand and live music is starting again in November. It sounds to me that the 2 kilometer drive off gravel road is worth the rubber.

 

Social Cafe and Cocktail Lounge Surfing Sinaloa

The Social Cafe Lounge located in the heart of the Golden Zone
seems to be the place to be if you want “soft live music in the background, a large grownup drink in front of you and a beautiful friend to your right” ~Reviewer FrankyFigs2015.

The prices are amazing, they offer free wifi and parking and there’s live music on Thursday nights at 6:30, but get there early cause it fills up quick. The Social serves everything from Martinis, Cocktails, Mojitos, Vinos, Cervezas and more.

On they’re food menu they serve Salads, Pizzas, Sliders, Bagels, Paninis, Delicious Desserts and other great items. I can’t wait to try their “Cookies and Cream blended coffee drink with a little adult fun in it” 😉 Cash only.

 

Things To Do

Huana Coa Canopy Adventure

The Huana Coa Canopy Adventure is off the hook! They offer three different options for your adventure. Combo #1 is Canopy + ATV, Combo #2 is Canopy + Horseback Riding and Combo #3 is Horseback riding + ATV. It’s kind of a long ride to get there but it’s definitely worth it and they even pick you up in a WWII vehicle.

They have an awesome staff including “Yara, Liz, Filipe, Danny and Jesus” who love their jobs and are fun to be around. Safety is their first priority, they have two lines just in case and you can zip upside down. When you’re done zip lining you have lunch and ride your ATV or horse to have a guided tour (with samples) of where they make their tequila!

There’s no pressure to buy any but you’ll probably want to since it’s better and cheaper then buying it back at your hotel. Don’t forget to bring your sunglasses and GoPro! Check out this Video about Huana Coa.

Surfing Sinaloa

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Jaco Costa Rica

Travel & Surfing Jaco Costa Rica

Surfing Jaco Costa Rica

Surfing Jaco Costa Rica

The Basics About Jaco Costa Rica

There’s a lot to be said about Jacó, some of it is rad, but some of it is quite grungy, even for a surf bum.

For years, this beach town has been getting mixed reviews from all sorts of surfers, travelers, and vacationers, so we’re here to set the record straight.

Having visited Jacó dozens of times, I know the best places to stat, eat, and party, without feeling unsafe or unclean.  The overall structure of Jacó is incredible.  There’s basically one ‘busy’ street in Jacó, which is full of surf shops, taco joints, souvenir emporiums, and a whole lot of places to get drunk.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]There’s definitely a technique to visiting Jacó, because if you decide to just wing it solo and stay at the cheapest hostel and eat the cheapest meals, you’ll have a terrible time. [/box]

There will be a ton of people trying to convince you to stay here and eat there, but if you follow the advice on this page, I guarantee you’ll have the trip of a lifetime.

The Town Jaco Costa Rica

Jaco Costa Rica

Jaco Costa Rica

Similar to the majority of Costa Rican surf towns, Jacó caters to surfers, partiers, vacationers, and a ton Gringos.  Though Tamarindo gets the name Tama-Gringo, Jacó brings in the masses of Gringos and fat Americans.

I say this with all honesty, if you want to avoid chubby, pale, gnarly looking vacationers, then I would seek a surf trip elsewhere.  This is not to say that there aren’t beautiful surf babes in Jacó, because there’s a ton!

As you enter town from the north, you’ll drive past a Best Western (great place to stay if you want a quiet place), then past Tico Loco Tacos, and then you’ll eventually cross the bridge to enter the heart of Jacó, Costa Rica.

With the famous slogan “Get Wacco in Jacó”, you can imagine why so many surf bums and party animals choose to call this place home.  There aren’t too many places in Costa Rica that are really built up, and Jacó isn’t extremely built up either, but compared to somewhere like Dominical or Avellanas—this places is crazy incorporated.

You won’t find skyscrapers and all inclusive resorts, but you’ll discover that Playa Jacó and Key West Florida look incredibly familiar—feels like Spring Break most of the year.

Jacó is without a doubt the most convenient surf town in Costa Rica, because you’ll be able to get just about everything you’d ever need in this town.  Whether you’re looking for a specific set of surf fins, a name brand type of whiskey, or simply want some constant waves, Jacó is definitely a great place to do any of the three.

When my friends visit from the states, I don’t personally take them to Jacó (especially my parents), but if you are on a strict budget and can’t make it to the rarities of Pavones or Avellanas, then I’d definitely recommend a place like Jacó.

If you and your boys (or girls) are planning a surf trip, but want to have a bunch of late nights, then choosing a place like Jacó can be very smart.

Your day will begin with awaking to the noise of Ticos selling lottery tickets in the streets and noisy Americans strolling through the streets—some of them likely never went to sleep. Your hostel will offer a free breakfast, otherwise you can find several eateries off the main drag that provide American or Tico style breakfast for about 5$.

Map Of Jaco Costa Rica

Map Of Jaco Costa Rica

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]If you choose to cook your own meals, you’ll end up paying about 3-4$ for each meal.  Eggs, chicken, bread, and milk are all ridiculously cheap, so keep that in mind. [/box]

As far as places to eat, drink, and party, Jacó has some of the best of Costa Rica.  Though it doesn’t mirror the quality of some of the tourist heavy spots like Manuel Antonio or Tamarindo, it definitely has some great spots.

My favorite place to munch down at would have to be the Taco Bar of Jaco.  This place has fresh fish, chicken, and beef tacos at a pretty affordable price.  You’ll end up spending about 14$ on three tacos, so if you’re on a backpacking budget this place is not ideal.  But, if you can spend the cash and enjoy a nice taco, then you’d be insane not to make a stop here.

Arigato Sushi

Arigato Sushi

If you like sushi and want to treat yourself, then there’s a place called Arigato Sushi on the main strip where you can feast on some of the best sushi in Costa Rica for under 20$.  As I recall they don’t open their doors until 6 or 7 pm, due to the fact they only cook with the fish that’s caught that day.  Yes, it’s that fresh.  The chefs here are world class and if you order the Jacó roll, you won’t be disappointed.

If you want to party, it won’t be difficult.  There’s dozens of pub crawls, bars, and drug dealers everywhere, so if that’s what you’re looking for, you chose the right beach town.

I have a friend named Billy from NYC who opened a bar called Moonshine on the main strip, where you’ll find 2$ cocktails and a ton of great people to party with.  Otherwise, you can go dancing at Pub Orange, drink a few beers with local surfers at Swell Bar, but you best bet is to get to sleep early and catch the sunrise surf.  Because once 10 a.m. hits, the water will be packed.

Surfing In Jaco Costa Rica

Located in the Golfo de Nicoya area of Costa Rica, Jacó has a fair amount of exposed breaks and doesn’t bring in too many surfers.  Normally there will be reliable offshore winds from the northeast, but like any beach, it can be terrible on bad days.  The best swell is going to be fro the south, southwest, which will bring in beach breaking waves in both directions.

Whether you like rights or lefts, both will be thundering if you get to Jacó on a good day.  Though some of the locals prefer to surf low-tide because the waves are a bit more hallow, I really only surf it during high tide.  I’ve found that as the tide comes in, the waves break a little cleaner and because the beach is so huge, it’s never too crowded.  Though I say it’s not crowded, the best point (further south), is by far the best.  The waves on this end of the beach are much larger and don’t wash out as easily.Surfing Jaco Costa Rica

One of the best parts about Jacó is the fact that it’s so versatile for every skill level.  I’ve been to a ton of beaches around the world and I’ve never seen as many surf camps than in Jacó Beach.

Not only are there about 30 surf shops (all offering lessons) in the town, but there’s an additional 10-12 beach front surf schools.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]These are great for beginners that have never surfed before, while intermediate surfers should stay away from these classes.[/box]
Surfing Jaco Costa Rica

Surfing Jaco Costa Rica

The instructors will do just about anything to convince you to take a lesson, but don’t listen! They’ll tell you that there’s sharks in the water, a terrible jellyfish population, or sting ray breeding season, but they are probably lying.

I’ve surfed Jacó dozens of times and I’ve never seen, heard, or even slightly thought about a shark.  Sting rays are a different story.  I’ve been stung 5 times in my life, once was at Jacó, but it’s all part of the sport.

Because there’s a ton of advanced surfers who visit Costa Rica, I have to mention Playa Hermosa de Jacó.  This is where you’re going to want to surf.  The wave works very well when it reaches overhead heights and has a ton of power.  Hermosa is only about a 5-10 minute drive from Jacó, so it’s easy to get to. Hermosa is a great spot to visit if a big swell comes in, especially if you’ve got the balls to try a tow-in day.  My advice, check the surf report and bring the gun.

Let check the surf now . . .



Where to Stay Jaco Costa Rica

The Buddha House Hostel:  This is one of the best options for surfers and backpackers that don’t have a bunch of money to spend on accommodations.  I normally either stay here, or with friends.

Buddha House Boutique Hostel

Buddha House Boutique Hostel

The Buddha House is clean, safe, and comfortable.  Three things that you won’t find everywhere in Jacó.  A room will cost you 12$/night for the shared dorms, 25$/night for the private air conditioned rooms, and 35$/night for the master bedroom.

They have a beautiful Argentinian receptionist named Camilla, basically the reason I sleep there.  You’ll feel at home at the Buddha House, so get cozy and enjoy your vacation.

http://hostelbuddhahouse.com

Clarita’s:  Easily the most lively place to stay in Jacó.  This place is home to the Miss Jacó competition each year, so you imagine what type of things ensure.

Room 2 Board Jaco Costa Rica

Room 2 Board Jaco Costa Rica

Wet T-shirt contests, beer pong, and a ton of other games.  I don’t specifically stay here, because I like to sleep at night, but I always catch a few post surf brews here.

Clarita’s is notorious for housing hundreds of drunk people, especially during high season.  Though it can get quite ratchet some nights, it is actually a decent hotel.  Rooms are anywhere from 40-100$/night.

http://www.claritashotel.com

Room 2 Board:  This is a huge hostel complex, where a ton of backpackers stay.  Rooms are 10-15/night, rooms lock, and it’s pretty clean.  This is the largest hostel, so you’ll be able to meet people from around the world.

They host pub crawls, surf camp, and Spanish lessons, so it’s a pretty organized facility.

http://www.room2board.com

To Sum it Up Jaco Costa Rica

Jacó is a great vacation spot in Costa Rica, but it is most definitely not for everyone.  If you’re young, like to party, and are comfortable with your surf skills, then you may feel right at home here.

There’s a ton of great eateries, a decent amount of waves, and one of the rowdiest nightlifes in all of Central America.  Things to keep in mind!

Jaco is not as safe as the majority of other surf towns, so keep your belongings close!  Don’t bring out too much cash, don’t get too drunk, and don’t walk on the beach at night.  The locals in Jacó are by far the worst, so if you slam a bottle of Flor de Caña and smoke a bag of grass, don’t expect to make it home with any dignity.

If you avoid the beach, stay with your group, and know a little Spanish, you won’t have to worry about anything.  Just don’t follow a local into a dark ally, use your head!  Though it isn’t the most extravagant place to surf, Jacó is a great beach, full of a lot of great surfers, so rip some waves and drink some rum!

Maps Jaco Costa Rica

jaco costa rica map

 

jaco costa rica map

 

surfing jaco costa rica map

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Surfing Puerto Viejo Costa Rica & Salsa Brava

Surfing Puerto Viejo Costa Rica & Salsa Brava

Puerto-ViejoDid you read In Search of Captain Zero? If you did then you know all about this place. If you didn’t read this book but plan on visiting this side of Costa Rica then you know which book to read next.

Puerto Viejo, also know as Puerto Viejo de Talamanca, has been home to some of Costa Rica’s most legendary surf competitions, parties, and cuisines for decades.  As you walk around this Afro Caribbean little town, you soon realize why so many expats and Ticos have been calling this place home for so many years.

Dozens of beach cruisers line the beach, creating a homey atmosphere for vacationers and surfers alike.  Though Salsa Brava has been famed as one of the biggest waves of the Caribbean side, Playa Cocles usually dishes out a super powerful beach braking wave as well.

Only the most experienced of surfers should hang around Salsa Brava, because this reef breaking wave has been known to rip inexperienced surfers apart with it’s notorious “cheese grater”.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]The last thing you want while surfing in Puerto Viejo is a trip to the hospital, so don’t test your limits at Salsa Brava unless you truly can handle a fast breaking left. [/box]

One of the most important things you need to remember as a foreigner is that though you may be a rad surfer, the locals in Costa Rica have been ripping these breaks since you were in diapers.  Though the majority of Tico surfers are going to welcome you with open arms into the lineup, beware of dropping in on an old timer because they will put you in your place.

This video show the wave at Salsa Brava at it’s best . . .

As one of the biggest tourist destinations in the country, Puerto Viejo has a considerable amount of surf tourists.  As long as you respect your elders and wait your turn, a day on the waves in Puerto Viejo can be an unforgettable experience.

From my experience in Puerto Viejo, you either want to party, surf and party, or surf and party, and party.  The whole town comes alive at night, so don’t be surprised if you end up watching the sunrise with your crew.

Though I wouldn’t say the waves were exactly what I expected, I’d admit that they were fun.  If you’re in Puerto Viejo when conditions are choppy, you best be in good shape because the current is typically pretty strong.

Surfing Salsa Brava & Playa Cocles Puerto Viejo

– Best Season: November-April
– Best Swell Direction: Northeast

Salsa Brava is considered to be the biggest break in all of Costa Rica, this Caribbean style wave works the best during the dry season (Nov-April).

Known for claiming an excessive amount of “sauce” each year, Salsa Brava takes a considerable amount of broken boards, bones, and gnarly cuts each day, so beware of the shallow beach break.

There are a few different take off points at Salsa Brava, but the North Peak is by far the most popular for surfers looking to get uber pitted.  Though the reef at Salsa Brava broke a few years ago during one of the area’s earthquakes, you’ll still see huge days there, just not nearly as frequently.

Let’s check it right now . . .

And the forecast . . .

The wave holds its size under most conditions and is probably going to be best when the report is head high to overhead conditions.  When a south-east swell is in and you’re getting western winds, chances are you’ll find yourself barrel hunting at Brava.  Once again, beware of the shallow reef, which has been known to destroy surfers of all skill levels.

Playa Cocles is your best bet when Salsa Brava isn’t working. Cocles is only about a 10 minute walk from Salsa Brava, or 2 minute bike ride.  Cocles hosts a ton of surf competitions each year, so if you can catch one of these events, they truly are a great time to be in Puerto Viejo.  Lots of surfer after parties and late night shenanigans with the locals.  Similar to Salsa Brava, Cocles best conditions come out when it receives a head high to overhead swell from the northeast.

Salsa Brava Purto Viejo Costa Rica

Getting Pitted at Salsa

But if the seas are choppy, Cocles doesn’t work very well.  While I was surfing Cocles, we had shit north winds and gale warnings, so surf was iffy.  If this happens, my best advice is to either wait it out, or head down to Panama.

Surfing Playa Negra Costa Rica

Surfing Playa Negra Costa Rica

Playa Negra is perfect for people who want to surf while they’re in Puerto Viejo, but don’t want to have a date with Salsa Brava’s cheese grater. While I wouldn’t recommend Negra for experienced surfers, if you’re just starting to learn to surf, taking a lesson in Negra is a wise decision. Snorkeling, swimming, and diving is popular over in Negra, but you’ll catch a few 2-3 footers if you’re there on the right day.

Puerto Viejo Costa Rica Things To Do

Puerto Viejo is a huge fan favorite for tourists, mainly because it has a very unique vibe that you simply cannot find anywhere else in Costa Rica. The town was originally called Old Harbor until the Costa Rican government institutionalized Spanish as the new local language and changed the names of the towns and landmarks in the area from English to Spanish.

Madre-Tierra-Puerto-Viejo

Madre Tierra Puerto Viejo

Though the true barrel hunting surfers prefer to hang out on the Pacific Ocean, Puerto Viejo’s Afro-Caribbean vibe is rad.  As you walk through the center of town, you’ll see Rastas shooting dice, playing checkers, and selling the best ganja in the country.

Everything in Puerto Viejo is going to cost significantly more money, but a lot of the time it’s worth it.  There’s a ton of Jamaicans that migrated to Costa Rica’s eastern coast, so the food that’s served up is super authentic.  If you see any chubby Jamaican ladies serving up Caribbean Jerk and Jamaican marinated chicken, I highly suggest you buy as much as you possibly can.

Puerto Viejo is set up to cater to tourists of all budgets, interests, and ages.  So, obviously there’s going to be a lot to do while you visit Puerto Viejo.

You’ll find a variety of bars that cater to just about all styles of music, but if mainly you’re going to find super swanky Reggae clubs that have been dishing out Jamaican tunes for decades.  One of the local favorites is a place called Lazy Mon, which hosts fire dancing shows and other live musical acts.

Tasty Waves Cantina is another great place to get your buzz on is this little surf bar.  And of course there’s Johnny’s Place, which is the area’s long standing dance club/bar.  A lot of fun ensues at Johnny’s place, from the shenanigans at the bar to the roots, rock, and reggae vibe of the dance floor—you’ll have a great night here guaranteed.

If you’re looking for a hostel type party with a bunk of beautiful surf babes, then head down to Rockin’ J’s and you’ll find a party, especially if it’s a full moon.

Everyone loves to ride beach cruisers here and it’s almost necessary if you want to truly feel the energy of this little beach town.  The town has a lot, but isn’t too spread out, so you’re able to really see the entire thing quicker if you have a bike.

[box type=”alert” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Remember to lock bikes there’s a ton of bike theft in Puerto Viejo. [/box]

It’s also super nice to just cruise around on a beach cruiser when you’re waiting for the tide.  Puerto Viejo is without a doubt one of the most unique parts about Costa Rica, because the atmosphere is very Rastafari, praise Bob Marley, groove down to some late night Reggae.

Where To Stay Puerto Viejo Costa Rica

The Lazy Mon:  This is one of the areas most hopping bars when the sun goes down and I’m pretty sure you can get hostel style-dorm beds for around 11$ per night.  You can also request a personal room, but I’m not sure how much they’d cost you.  They have a good restaurant here, but if you want to sleep, you’d be better off finding a house rental or hotel.

Trip Advisor Link

rocking-j-sRocking J’s:  Rockin’s J’s is without a doubt the largest and most expansive hostel I’ve ever seen.  You can rent hammock for like 6$/night, or set up your own tent or hammock for something around 4$.

There are also dorm beds, private cabanas, honeymoon shacks, and bunch of other pretty awesome hostel accommodation.  I would by no means say this place is the clean, petite, boutique style hostel though.

It smells like beer, people party until 5 a.m. every night, there are no quiet hours, and if you stay here, you’re going party super hard. There’s a restaurant and bar at the hostel, but obviously you can bring whatever you want into the hostel.  Staff is super laid back.  So, they known you’re probably just a bum surfer who wants to drink rum & cokes, meet babes, and get stoked out of your gourd.

http://www.rockingjs.com/

La Ruka Hostel: Another great hostel in Puerto Viejo, but with a much more laid-back, relaxed vibe than a place like Rocking J’s.  This hostel is more family-friendly, but there’s definitely a ton of backpackers here.  It’s much smaller, cleaner, and less “touristy” than a lot of the other hostels of the area.  It’s located just down the road from Salsa Brava and about a 15 minute walk from Playa Cocles, so you really have the best of both worlds at La Ruka.  Bunks cost 10$/night and private rooms are 30$/night.

http://www.larukahostel.com/

Hotel Banana Azul:  Though there aren’t too many hotel options in Puerto Viejo, there are definitely a few available for travelers that want a bit more comfort during their vacation.  Banana Azul is one of the places I’d recommend to surfers that have a little more budget to work with.  A pretty cool guy from Vancouver owns this place with one of his buddy’s from Peru, good bunch and they offer a great place for surfers and vacationers to stay while they’re in Puerto Viejo.

http://www.bananaazul.com/

bob-marleyMore can be found here on Trip Advisor.

To Sum it Up

Puerto Viejo is a great surf destination if you like to party, or if you arrive during the right time of the year.  There’s a ton to do here, from surfing gnarly reef breaks to watching spun-out fire dancers perform at local bars, I guarantee you’ll enjoy your time in Puerto Viejo.

One thing to remember is that this is a tourist town, so a lot of your expenses will be higher than if you were to vacation in a more remote destinations.  The entire atmosphere of the town is surrounded by Rastafarianism and reggae, so if you are uncomfortable with either, you’ll hate it.

But, if you’re like 99% of the world, you’ll find your vibe in this little party-heavy town in the Caribbean mon—and don’t forget the words of Bob Marley, [quote]”Life is one big road with lots of signs. So when you riding through the ruts, don’t complicate your mind. Flee from hate, mischief and jealousy. Don’t bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality. Wake Up and Live!” (and surf).[/quote]

 

Puerto Viejo Costa Rica Maps

Puerto Viejo Costa Rica Maps

Puerto Viejo Costa Rica Maps Puerto Viejo Costa Rica Maps

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Surf Guide To Punta De Lobo Chile

Surf Trip ChileSurf Guide to Punta de Lobo Chile

*Bonus Pichilemu Chile

I was blown away by this country and truly believe it to be one of the most untouched countries in the world as far as natural beauty.  I mean, Chile is home to the legendary “Patagonia”, where though you cannot surf, you’re able to see a part of nature that only a handful of people have seen.

When you look at the length of the coastline it seems like Chile should have the longest coast in the world—actually, not even close. Chile ranks 19th in the world for coastal length and the top three countries with the most coastline are: Canada, Indonesia and Greenland (USA is 8th).

Ok, let’s get back to Chile.

The water is an electric bluish gray, barely any life can sustain existence, and the air is so clean it almost brings backpackers to tears.  Chile has a special place in my heart.  From the heavy lefts I surfed in Pichilemu to the fresh vegetable markets of Valparaiso, Chile will forever be one of my favorite places to visit.

The Basics: Punta de Lobos

As far as authentic Chilean culture is concerned Pichilemu and Punta de Lobos are two of the best surf towns to visit.  You’ll catch a view of how this part of South America does business; hot dogs with mayo, chilly water, Pisco sours, and some of the tastiest lefts in the entire continent.

Surf Guide to Punta de Lobo ChileThe people of Chile rarely sport anything but a smile, making surfers feel right at home as they travel around with their clanky board bags and salty hair.  I spent 3 weeks traveling around Chile and saw the good, the bad, and the just straight up bizarre.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]I partied in Valparaiso for New Years, took a chick to the ER on New Years, and surfed into 2015 in some of the chilliest water I’ve every come across. [/box]

The entire country of Chile is a pretty gritty place, but as long as you don’t mind authentic Spanish culture and bit of poverty, you’ll feel right at home in this mountainous country.

Chileans have a very unique style and charisma, it’s a very positive vibe that they’re transcending to visitors, which is what made my experience so amazing.  While you’re in Chile it’s nearly impossible not to see some of the most incredible landscapes in the world.  You can drive four hours and find yourself in deserts, mountains, beaches, cities, snow, sunshine, caves, and just about everything in between.

The Waves: Punta de Lobo & Pichilemu

Alright, the waves of Pichilemu are going to be more geared towards the more beginners, while Punta de Lobo is the hotspot for intermediate and advance surfers.  Both towns are going to be giving you a solid left and the wave is pretty heavy.

Anyone who has every surfed Punta de Lobo will tell you how incredible of a wave it is.  It’s a consistent left that can push you a few hundred yards and when it’s really working, barrel you to the third dimension.

There are a few different points at Punta de Lobo, so if you aren’t entirely comfortable with a barreling left, don’t be worried.  You must be aware that Punta de Lobo is home to Quicksilver’s Big Wave Invitational, so the wave can reach over 20-30 feet without warning.  Also, you won’t be surfing above a soft pillow, there’s a ton of rocks at Punta de Lobo, but there are by no means dangerous if you have quality surf experience.

Let’s check the surf right now . . .



 

Regardless of your surf level, the glassy waves of Pichilemu and Punta de Lobo will surely have you shredding daily and having a great surf adventure in Chile.

 

Punta de Lobo

How To Punta de Lobos From Santiago (3-5 Hour Drive)

Most surfer fly into Santiago, Chile and move forward from there.  You can either rent a car, or travel by bus. I found several flights with one stop for under $1000—which is damn good considering that it cost me $750 to fly to El Salvador a few weeks ago and the flight to Chile is 13 hours versus 5 to El Salvador.

how much to fly from los angeles to chile

Check flights on Orbitz from June – July.

 

The bus system is incredible in Chile and you can get just about anywhere on public transit (and the public buses are super nice), so I recommend busing around the country.

From Santiago you’ll be able to find several buses heading to Pichilemu, probably 4-5 per day.  The bus ride is about 3 hours and it’ll take you about a mile from the hostels and cabanas of the town.  However, if you have a car, traveling around will become much, much easier and you’ll be able to hit a ton more beaches.

Also, if you find that the wave isn’t working in the area, it’s super easy to just pack up the car and head further north or south.

Though they speak Spanish in Chile, beware that the tongue and dialect they use here is nearly impossible to understand if you don’t have some serious Spanish background.

As a fluent Spanish speaker, even I found it hard to understand a lot of the Chileans I came across.  But luckily Chileans are just about the raddest South Americans in the game, so as long as you sport a smile and know how to properly share your space in the lineup, life is easy.

Where To Stay Punta de Lobos & Pichilemu

Pichilemu Surf Hostal:  This is where I stayed, it’s a small little surf friendly hostel, located right on the beach.  You get your own room, great for couples and people that just want to chill, not as good for surfers who just want to drink Pisco sours and rip overhead waves.

Pichilemu Surf Hostal

Located On The Water

It’s about a 10 minute drive from the main Punta de Lobo surf break, so barrel hunters should find a cabana closer to Punta de Lobo.  You get free breakfast and the safety of clean hostel at an affordable price, but the overall atmosphere of the hostel is pretty laid back.  There’s an amazing

http://www.surfhostal.com/index.html

Cabanas Buena Vista:  This is where I’ll stay if I ever return back to Pichilemu.  It’s pretty close to the Punta de Lobo surf break, it has a hot tub (it’s so cold in Chile, trust me, you want a hot tub), spacious cabanas, and from what I remember, was fairly cheap.  You really want to be able to speak some Spanish if you want to reserve one of these cabins, because the lady who owns them is 100% Chilean and knows very little English.

http://www.cabanasbuenavista.com

Hotel Rocas del Pacifico:  This is going to be your standard hotel in the Pichlemu area, not what I’d recommend, but if you need a hotel, this is an option.  You have to remember that you’re in a desolate Chilean town and there isn’t going to a Ritz or Four Seasons.  That’s why it’s best to just splurge on your own cabana.  Buy your own bottle of rum, eat your own food, which in the end will save you a ton of money.

The Town: Stay in Pichilemu—Surf In Punta de Lobos

My best advice is to look for accommodation in Pichilemu, because Punta de Lobos is strictly for surfing, accommodation is nearly non existent here.

[box type=”info” size=”large” style=”rounded”]Pichilemu is where everything is happening anyways, so finding a nice little cabana here is your best bet for a great surf trip.[/box]

Pichilemu is a pretty small town and is fairly easy to access, so don’t worry about renting a car while you’re in Chile, unless you want to hit numerous beaches on the coast.  Pichilemu, like the majority of other Chileans cities is going to be super gritty, dusty, and authentic.  Horse drawn carriages and Chileans smoking the peace pipe are not uncommon sights here, the vibe in Pichilemu could be described as hippie/surf/dirt bag, but that’s how I’d describe half of my surfer friends, so I’m not sure how much that’ll help.

One thing that you really should remember about Pichilemu and Chile in general is that it can be fairly expensive.  Obviously if all you eat is empanadas, you’ll be able to live very cheaply, but from my experience in Valparaiso and Pichilemu, meals were very expensive.  The best thing you can do for your wallet and stomach is prepare a few meals of your own each week.

To Sum It Up

Pichilemu, ChilePichilemu is the place where you’re going to want to rest your head, rage your face, and stuff your mouth, while Punta de Lobo is where you really ant to be to surf.

There’s a ton of hotel/hostel/cabana accommodations in the surrounding areas, so choose a place that you think will fit your crew’s needs.  Also, depending where you’re coming from, the water is super cold.

I’d been surfing Central America for eight months before I went to Chile and the water was unbearable for the first day or so.  Honestly, the more neoprene you have the better; I rode with a 3/2 full suit, booties, and gloves.

But, there ain’t nothing wrong with a few hard nipples if Punta de Lobo is going to send you barreling 200 yards left!

Join Holly For Yoga Surf Retreat in Nica

Join Holly For Yoga Surf Retreat in Nica

Yoga Surf. It’s been a great week in LA, and this morning i’m off to Ecuador. I scored some really fun waves at the spot where I learned how to surf and a few photos too (see attached). Also a cover (and inside story) on South Bay Fit magazine.

See below for links to a few videos….

Surfing in Hainan: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgFYANfEpkw
Board Painting Lifestyle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQxpuhB6o0Q
Waves for Everyone in Nicaragua: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuqAV_BOr5Q
Road Tripping: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMMdgyvLBxM

And finally, I have a few more spots remaining to be filled in my womens surf yoga retreat March 26 – April 2, and April 3 to 10. If you know any awesome adventurous ladies looking to improve their surfing skills or learn to surf in warm water, please let them know!

http://www.surfwithhollybeck.com

more updates from the Galapagos and Ecuador coming soon!

: )

Holly

Cork Traction Pad in Kauai

Cork Traction Pad in Kauai

Stoked Wave Tribe Customer Speaks: “Here is a pic of the Cork Traction pad I bought from you guys….Its getting some major action in Kauai! Love it! Happy Holiday!”

~ Joe, Kauai Surfer + Stoked Wave Tribe Customer

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Wave Tribe Speaks: Thanks for sending in the picture Joe, we love what you did with the tail of the board, those colors are awesome!

Happy holidays to you too!

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For more great testimonials click here

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Peace!

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